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Posted on in DUI

Kane County criminal defense attorney

If you have had your driving privileges suspended or revoked as the result of a conviction on charges of driving under the influence (DUI), your life can be greatly affected. You may struggle with keeping your job, continuing your education, and even caring for family members in need. Depending upon the circumstances of your case, however, you may be eligible for partial relief in the form of a Monitoring Device Driving Permit or a Restricted Driving Permit, either of which may allow you to resume some of your normal activities.

Monitoring Device Driving Permits

The state of Illinois offers two different forms of driving relief for those whose driving privileges have been suspended or revoked related to a DUI. The first is called a Monitoring Device Driving Permit, or MDDP, which is available for almost all first-time offenders during the period of statutory summary suspension for failing or refusing a chemical test for blood alcohol content. The MDDP allows a driver to operate a vehicle at any time, in any place, as long the vehicle is properly equipped with a Breath Alcohol Ignition Interlock Device (BAIID).

Restricted Driving Permits

During the period of revocation for a DUI conviction, a driver may be eligible to apply for a restricted driving permit, or RDP. An RDP is much more limited form of driving relief that only allows an approved driver to drive at specific times and in specific areas to get to work, school, alcohol education programs, or other approved activities. To be considered for an RDP, the driver must demonstrate that the revocation is causing a specific hardship and that other means of transportation are unavailable or inappropriate. He or she must also submit a current drug and alcohol evaluation, and relevant proof of treatment or remedial programs. The applicant must also appear for a hearing before an officer of the Secretary of State’s Department of Administrative Hearings. In many cases, especially for second or third DUI conviction, the driver will be required to continue using the BAIID as a condition of receiving the RDP.

Based on a driver’s individual needs and limitations, the RDP can be customized to only allow certain driving privileges. For example, a driver may be permitted to drive directly from home to work in the morning, and then from work to home in the evening. Any driving done outside of what is permitted by the RDP may result in additional penalties, including an increased period of revocation and the loss of the RDP.

If you have been charged with DUI, it is important to understand your options under the law. Contact an experienced Kane County criminal defense attorney today. At The Law Office of Brian J. Mirandola, we offer a free initial consultation so you can meet our team, ask questions, and get the guidance you need during a difficult time. Let us show you how we can help.

 

Sources:

https://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/departments/BAIID/rdp.html

ftp://www.ilga.gov/JCAR/AdminCode/092/092010010D04440R.html

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K6-206.1

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Posted on in BAIID

BAIID, Elgin Criminal Defense AttorneyMost people who decide to get behind the wheel after drinking usually realize that what they are doing is illegal and dangerous. Awareness regarding the danger and irresponsibility of drunk driving has steadily increased since the early 1990s when many states began to launch serious campaigns to deter drunk drivers. Around the same time, police departments across the country focused their efforts on cracking down on drunk driving offenses.

Unfortunately, however, the problem of driving under the influence has not, in any real way, been eradicated. The numbers, in fact, tend to fluctuate with no discernable pattern from one year to the next. In 2012, for example, there was a significant increase in the number of fatalities resulting from drunk driving, that after 2011 when the death toll fell below 10,000 for the first time.

Reaction to Rising Death Numbers

That year saw a 3.3 percent increase in fatalities, causing some activists to call for ignition interlock devices to be installed in the car of every convicted drunk driver across the country. In Illinois, a person convicted of drunk driving may apply for driving relief during the period of statutory license suspension and choose to have a Breath Alcohol Ignition Interlock Device (BAIID) installed in his/her vehicle. If a person convicted of drunk driving qualifies for the program and has the BAIID installed in his vehicle, there are no other stipulations regarding his driving rights. He or she may drive anywhere at any time and is allowed to travel, even interstate, providing that the BAIID is installed and functioning properly.

It is important to note that the state of Illinois does not force all convicted drunk drivers to install the BAIID. An offender may elect to simply not drive during the mandatory suspension period. However, if the person is then caught driving during the suspension he or she may be charged with a Class 4 felony, regardless of whether alcohol was again involved. The penalties for driving without an ignition interlock device during the period of license suspension include possible imprisonment of one to three years, a minimum of 30 days in jail or 300 hours of community service, and fines as high as $25,000.

Facing DUI Charges?

If you or a member of your family has been accused of drunk driving, seek legal help immediately. Contact an experienced DUI defense attorney in Kane County to discuss your case and your available options. Call 847-488-0889 to schedule your free consultation at The The Law Office of Brian J. Mirandola today.

Sources:

http://www.madd.org/blog/2013/november/2012-fatality-data.html

https://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/departments/BAIID/baiid.html

Last modified on

Posted on in Criminal Defense

DUI penaltyThe state of Illinois considers drunk driving to be a serious crime, and with good reason. According to statistics compiled by the Illinois Secretary of State, hundreds of people every year lose their lives in accidents related to drunk driving. With that in mind, the state imposes severe penalties like jail time, fines, and license suspensions for anyone caught driving under the influence. Even people who do not test positive for alcohol and instead simply refuse to take the breathalyzer test can still face serious penalties for doing so.

Penalties for Drunk Driving

In Illinois, drunk driving penalties start to occur once a person's blood alcohol content passes 0.08 percent, provided that they are over the age of 21. Underage drinkers trigger separate zero-tolerance penalties if they blow anything above a 0.00. Assuming the driver is of age, the severity of the DUI punishments depends on how many DUIs the person has had in the past. For a first offense, the person can find themselves in jail for up to a year, along with a possible fine of up to $2,500. Additionally, first-time DUI convictions result in a license suspension for at least one year. Furthermore, if the person's BAC is more than twice the legal limit, they face a mandatory minimum fine of $500, along with 100 hours of community service.

A second DUI sees very similar penalties with a few alterations. First, the person's driver's license is revoked for at least five years rather than just one. Also, the person would face a mandatory minimum sentence of either five days in jail, or 240 hours of community service. These penalties become even more severe after the third DUI conviction, with a person's license being revoked for at least a full decade. The third DUI also triggers a much harsher mandatory minimum prison sentence, with violators sentenced to between three and seven years in prison. Beyond these standard penalties, everyone convicted of even a single DUI must have an ignition interlock device placed in their car. These devices function like breathalyzers and prevent people from turning on the car if they cannot pass the sobriety test.

Penalties for Refusing the Test

Even refusing to take the sobriety test can trigger serious legal penalties. This is because Illinois has an "implied consent" law, which means that people agree to submit to alcohol testing as a condition of getting their driver's license. A failure to take this test when asked can result in a suspension of a person's license for at least one year, with multiple refusals increasing the time.

If you or a loved one is currently facing DUI charges, contact experienced Kane County criminal lawyer Brian J. Mirandola. A dedicated criminal defense attorney can help you avoid serious criminal penalties that can follow you for life.
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