The Law Office of Brian J. Mirandola

CALL FOR A FREE CONSULTATION

47 DuPage Court, Elgin, IL 60120

847-488-0889
Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Kane County Defense Attorney

Posted on in DUI

IL DUI lawyerThe state of Illinois is strict when it comes to punishments for driving under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol. However, first-time convictions generally have penalties that help an offender not repeat the offense as opposed to sending them to prison.

First-time DUI convictions are considered Class A misdemeanors and come with revocation of the driver’s license for one year. Additionally, vehicle registration will be suspended for a set amount of time.

Blood alcohol concentration (BAC) also plays a role in DUI penalties; if a first-offender has a BAC of over .16, they will have to pay a fine of $500 and participate in 100 hours of community service.

When Does Jail Become a Punishment?

First-time offenders should only be punished with jail time if their DUI offense occurs while they are transporting another person under the age of 16 years old. This is assuming no other charges are issued during the crime.

When a driver commits a second or subsequent DUI offense, then jail time becomes a mandatory part of the punishment. A second DUI conviction is charged as a Class A misdemeanor punishable as a five-day jail term - or 240 hours of community service - and a five-year revocation of driver’s license. Fine of $1,250 if BAC is over .16

Third and subsequent DUI convictions are considered “aggravated” offenses, for which the charges become felonies punishable with revocation of driver’s license, vehicle registration suspension, a 90-day mandatory jail sentence if BAC is over .16, and a fine of up to $25,000.

A jail term can also be added to punishments if other charges are issued during a DUI investigation. Charges that can lead to jail time include:

  • Endangering a minor passenger
  • Collision with another motor vehicle
  • Injury or death of another driver and/or pedestrian (vehicular manslaughter)
  • Fleeing the scene of an accident
  • Certain types of property damage (if the cost for repair is between $10,000 and $100,000)

DUI Defense Strategies

A common way to defend against serious DUI punishments is to refuse to take a breathalyzer test at the scene of the traffic stop. This will make it impossible to determine BAC at the time of the crime, however, if a driver refuses the test, their license will automatically be suspended for one year.

All those who are fighting a DUI charge can build a defensive strategy to avoid jail time and the first step should be to hire a lawyer. A professional knows how to build a strategy and make sure no unnecessary punishment is given out.

Contact an Elgin, IL DUI Defense Attorney

DUI traffic stops can be a complicated process and sometimes information can be mixed up. If you or someone you know is fighting a DUI charge with false information or unlawful treatment of the police, hire a lawyer from the Law Offices of Brian J. Mirandola. A knowledgeable Kane County DUI defense lawyer can help make sure your rights have not been violated and protect you from serious punishment. To schedule a free consultation, call our office at 847-488-0889.

 

Source:

https://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/publications/pdf_publications/dsd_a118.pdf

Last modified on

IL defense lawyerIt has been getting harder and harder for criminals to steal from retail shops due to the security measures being taken. However, people still attempt to steal and unfortunately, this makes stores extra cautious.

As a result, patrons who frequent a specific store may be falsely accused of retail theft if they have previous purchases with them when they enter the store. Without the proper authorities being involved, a falsely accused person could face possible felony charges.

What Are Illinois’ Penalties for Retail Theft?

The state of Illinois covers a wide range of criminal actions when it comes to retail theft. A person could face charges of retail theft not only for running from a store without buying items but also if they are caught:

  • Switching labels on an item to make it seem cheaper in price
  • Attempting to remove security devices from an item to not set off the alarm
  • Moving an item from its proper container to attempt to decrease the value
  • Claiming ownership of an item that was taken without purchase
  • Using an anti-theft device to hide the crime

Charges and punishments are given out depending on the monetary amount stolen and if the accused has a history of thievery. Retail theft of items valued lower than $300 will be cited as a Class A misdemeanor for first offenses and a Class 4 felony for subsequent offenses.

If the value of the stolen items totals more than $300, the thief will be charged with a Class 3 felony for first and subsequent offenses.

Punishments include fines of as much as $25,000 for felony cases ($2,500 for misdemeanors) and prison time depending on the severity of the case.

How Could Someone Be Suspected of Theft When There Was No Crime?

It is common for someone to enter a store where they previously purchased an item in order to buy another similar product. For example, a woman could enter a store with a previously purchased bottle of makeup looking to compare her purchase with a fresh bottle that she would like to buy.

The shopper could be confronted by the store’s security if they see her pocketing the used bottle before going to buy her new purchase. This is a common “mistake of fact” which is a simple defense for false theft accusations; if the shopper simply proves that she entered the store with the already opened and used purchase, the accusations become void.

Other defensive strategies for false accusations include:

  • Proving that the criminal action was done on accident
  • Proving that the accused did not know that the theft was happening
  • Proving that the accused was persuaded to steal and they would not have done so without pressure
  • Proving that the accused did not know what they were doing was wrong

Contact an Elgin, IL Retail Theft Lawyer

Some false accusations of retail theft cannot be resolved simply. If the retail establishment insists that there was a crime, the accused should contact a lawyer from the Law Offices of Brian J. Mirandola to build a defensive strategy and avoid unlawful consequences. To schedule a free consultation with a Kane County retail theft lawyer, call our office at 847-488-0889.

 

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K16-25

Last modified on

IL defense attorneyChildren who are exposed to drug usage at a young age are more likely to start abusing drugs themselves. Adults who possess or use a controlled substance can face felony charges which leads to fines, jail time, and probation.

Juveniles who are caught in possession, or using, drugs will not face felony convictions because the Illinois court system focuses on rehabilitation rather than punishment. The hope is to steer young adults away from drug use before they get into real trouble after reaching full adulthood.

Illinois Drug Laws

Juveniles face the same drug rules that adults do, except that tobacco is also considered a “controlled substance” because nicotine is addictive. In July, Illinois raised the legal age to purchase cigarettes and e-cigarettes from 18 to 21 years old.

As for marijuana and other drugs, there is zero-tolerance for minors to possess or use drugs. Adults who are caught selling drugs to minors face twice the amount of jail time than if they sold to another adult. The minors are punished by:

  • Drug counseling for the minor and their parents.
  • Probation in that a minor will be required to attend check-in with a probation officer while also attending school regularly and participating in community service. If the minor is of legal working age, they will also be required to maintain a job.
  • Complete a diversion program which is similar to probation, but less formal because the minor will not have to go through juvenile court to have their probation requirements ordered.

Only in serious cases - or repeat offenses - will a child be sent to detention for drug possession. Aside from a juvenile detention facility, a minor offender can be sentenced to home confinement, foster care, or sent to a juvenile home.

Defending Against Juvenile Drug Charges

While the crime will not usually see a child sent to jail or have a permanent blemish on their record, it is still serious when a juvenile is convicted of drug possession. It can be difficult for the child to receive acceptance into a good college, enlist in the military, or eventually land the job of their dreams.

This is why minors and their parents should seek the help of a criminal defense lawyer who can investigate whether or not:

  • The minor’s rights were compromised in an illegal search and seizure.
  • The minor knew that they were in possession of a controlled substance; prosecution must prove this in order to convict.
  • The police involved acted professionally throughout the arrest of the minor.

A lawyer can also help the parents of the child if it is found out that the adults involved were also in possession of controlled substances. This could lead to child abuse offenses if the parents used the drugs around the minor.

Contact an Elgin, IL Drug Crimes Attorney

Minors have their whole lives ahead of them and a possible drug conviction could change the course of their lives. The lawyers of the Law Offices of Brian J. Mirandola can help make sure a minor avoids serious punishment from a drug charge. To schedule a free consultation with a Kane County drug crimes lawyer, call our office at 847-488-0889.

 

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs5.asp?ActID=1941&ChapterID=53

https://norml.org/laws/item/illinois-penalties

https://www.illinoispolicy.org/illinois-becomes-1st-state-in-midwest-to-raise-tobacco-age-to-21/

 

Last modified on

IL defense lawyerSexual assault is a felony crime in Illinois and can be considered a crime of domestic violence if the abuser is related to their victim.

Illinois law defines sexual assault as one person commits an act of sexual penetration without the consent of the other person involved. Another type of sexual assault is called “statutory rape” in which a person over the age of 18 years old engages in a sexual act with a minor - under 18 years old. Even if the minor gives consent, they are not considered old enough to be able to give proper consent and the adult can be charged with sexual assault.

According to Illinois Law

Illinois legislation reports that most cases of sexual assault are not even reported, let alone convictions made. Approximately only one in five reported cases end in a conviction; the number is so low because of the impact in which sexual assault takes on the victim.

Victims tend to face long-term mental scars after an attack. Not all of them are able to relive the trauma in order to bring their abuser to justice. Other cases do not end in conviction due to lack of evidence or false accusations.

Those that are convicted, however, face severe penalties:

  • First offenders are charged with a Class 1 felony punishable by a prison term of four to 15 years.
  • Second offenders are charged with a Class X felony punishable by either a lifetime prison sentence or a term of 30-60 years.
  • Aggravated sexual assault - if the offender uses a weapon, the victim is under 8 years old, or the victim is mentally disabled - results in a Class X felony punishable by a mandatory prison term of six to 30 years with the possibility of being extended to a life sentence.

Additionally, anyone convicted of sexual assault is required to register as a sex offender. In Illinois, a sex offender is required to register annually for a 10-year term. An offender only needs to register for 10 years unless they are labeled a “sexual predator” and then they will need to register for the remainder of their life.

Ways to Defend Allegations of Sexual Assault

Alleged sex offenders should hire an attorney who can investigate their case and avoid false convictions. It is not uncommon for victims to make a mistake and identify a wrong suspect during the investigation. Other times, a victim can falsely accuse an alleged abuser of the crime in order to get them into trouble.

Whatever the case, a lawyer will be able to learn the truth and build a strong defense:

  • There was consent: a lawyer could be able to prove that the defendant and their alleged victim consensually engaged in “hardcore” or “violent” sexual contact.
  • Mistaken identity: if an accused abuser shares physical qualities with a lot of other people, they can be mistaken for the actual criminal. A defense would be to find an alibi who can account for the accused’s whereabouts during the incident.
  • Insanity: a lawyer could prove that their client is not in the right state of mind to know right from wrong.

Contact an Elgin, IL Criminal Defense Attorney

A sexual assault conviction will change a person’s life forever. If the accused is an innocent person, they will have to face punishments unnecessarily. The lawyers of the Law Offices of Brian J. Mirandola are capable of making sure anyone accused of sexual assault can avoid a negative outcome to their case. To schedule a free consultation with a Kane County criminal defense lawyer, call our office at 847-488-0889.

 

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K11-1.20

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs3.asp?ActID=3731&ChapterID=54

https://www.isp.state.il.us/sor/faq.cfm?CFID=146006236&CFTOKEN=7e765f6e95c15f6c-3D3AA5CD-D893-F221-E6E5D902A39087CE&jsessionid=ec30dd33bd14bbd52e956c26a622b604f405#register

Last modified on

Posted on in Search Warrant

b2ap3_thumbnail_warrant.jpgIllinois police will be authorized to perform a search and seizure for a number of different crimes, including suspicion of drug possession and/or sale. However, there are rules that officers must follow in order to legally perform their duties.

Officers are not permitted to simply enter a private home without a warrant for the search and seizure. The Fourth Amendment of the United States Constitution protects a person in their own home from unreasonable searches.

What Is an Illegal Search and Seizure?

The Fourth Amendment says that a person is safe in the privacy of their home, documents, and effects from seizure and that no warrants will be issued unless there is probable cause for the search. This differs from the early days of the amendment when “general warrants” were issued and homes could be searched with no evidence at all.

Now, if the authorities have enough evidence to warrant a reasonable search, they are allowed to do so with the proper documentation.

A search becomes illegal if:

  • The properly documented warrant is not gathered and given to the homeowner prior to the search.
  • The police search personal areas of an apartment with only permission from a landlord or roommates. Legally, the police can search common areas of an apartment with only the landlord’s permission, but they cannot search bedrooms.
  • The police have no probable cause for entering the home or property.

What Can You Do to Defend After an Illegal Seizure?

The first thing to do after an illegal search and seizure is to hire a lawyer to build a case against the law enforcement officers who conducted the search. The victim of the search cannot sue the officers involved because of the “qualified immunity” doctrine which protects government officials while they perform their duties.

A victim can utilize the exclusionary rule which would prevent the government from using evidence obtained in illegal search and seizures. This strategy can protect the victim from criminal charges that would not have been discovered without an illegal search.

Contact an Elgin, IL Criminal Defense Attorney

If you or someone you know is a victim of an illegal search and seizure and are now facing criminal charges, as a result, hire a lawyer from the Law Offices of Brian J. Mirandola to defend your Fourth Amendment rights. To schedule a free consultation with a Kane County search and seizure lawyer, call 847-488-0889.

 

Sources:

https://constitutioncenter.org/interactive-constitution/amendments/amendment-iv

https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/exclusionary_rule

 

Last modified on
Avvo Illinois State Bar Association Kane COunty Bar Association
Back to Top