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Posted on in Theft

b2ap3_thumbnail_porch-pirate_20200217-141909_1.jpgSomeone is known as a “porch pirate” when they steal packages from the doorstep of someone else’s house. The state of Illinois is the 13th worst state in the country when it comes to packages being taken. This offense is punished as theft because the person who commits the violation has the intention of keeping the items they take and they know it is against the law. Under Illinois’ theft law, porch pirating is considered a misdemeanor for items that value under $500 and a felony for items that value over $500.

The Penalty for Being Caught Pirating from Porches

On average, 11 million homeowners have packages stolen from their doorsteps in one year. As a result, victims find themselves changing their schedules when they know they have a package being delivered so they can be home to claim their box immediately.

Others pay a hefty cost to install home cameras in order to catch any would-be porch pirates in the act. These products lead to the identification of the offending parties who are then liable for all stolen items.

Illinois law classifies porch pirating as a form of theft. Charges increase in severity depending on the value of the stolen items:

  • A Class A misdemeanor is charged when the stolen items have a value of $500 or less. Offenders face up to one year in jail and fines of up to $2,500.
  • A Class 4 felony is charged when the building being pirated is a place of worship, a school, or government property. Offenders face a prison term of 1-3 years and fines of up to $25,000.
  • A Class 3 felony is charged when the property being stolen values between $500 and $10,000. Offenders face a prison term of 2-5 years and fines of up to $25,000.
  • A Class 2 felony is charged when the property being stolen values between $10,000 and $100,000. Offenders face a prison term of 3-7 years and fines of up to $25,000.
  • A Class 1 felony is charged when the property being stolen values between $100,000 and $500,000. Offenders face a prison term of 4-10 years and fines of up to $25,000.
  • A Class X felony is charged when the property being stolen values over $1,000,000. Offenders face a prison term of 6-30 years and fines of up to $25,000.

On average, the property that is pirated from doorsteps values between $50 and $100.

How to Defend Against Allegations of Porch Pirating

Most of the time porch pirates are caught if the homeowner has a camera installed to monitor the front doorway. However, a camera can only capture so much and sometimes a certain identification cannot be made.

Or, a person could be falsely accused of porch pirating if their car was seen at the victim’s home when the package was taken.

Some defenses against charges of theft include:

  • Mistake of fact
  • No intent to permanently deprive the homeowner of their goods
  • Prove owner’s consent to the taking of the package
  • Coercion
  • Entrapment
  • Insanity

If the items are returned to the homeowner after charges are issued against the offender, this does not erase the theft charges.

Contact an Elgin, IL Criminal Defense Attorney

The lawyers from the Law Offices of Brian J. Mirandola have experience helping defendants of all sorts of theft cases. They can bring light to the facts of the case and protect clients from any unlawful punishments. To schedule a free consultation with a Kane County criminal defense lawyer, call our office at 847-488-0889.

 

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K16-1

https://patch.com/illinois/chicago/how-often-porch-pirates-steal-amazon-packages-chicago

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IL defense lawyerJoyriding is one common reason people steal motor vehicles. However, unlike vehicular theft, joyriding is usually a temporary theft that ends in either the thief returning the vehicle to where they found it or they abandon it when they are finished with it.

Illinois defines joyriding as vehicular trespass as opposed to theft which is punishable as a misdemeanor offense. Vehicular theft, on the other hand, is a felony with penalties that increase in severity based on the value of the vehicle that was stolen.

Joyriding Versus Vehicular Theft

Illinois punishes joyriders less severely than car thieves because the vehicles are usually returned to where they were stolen from - this is why it is easy to apprehend those who joyride.

Those who joyride will face a Class A misdemeanor which can be punished as one year in prison and/or a fine of up to $2,500.

Actual theft of a vehicle means that the offender has no intention of returning the car, boat, or aircraft they have taken. The most common reason people steal a vehicle is to sell it and make money and if this happens, it can be harder to find the right culprit.

In order to convict someone of vehicular theft, the prosecution must prove that the person who is found in possession of a stolen vehicle knew that the vehicle was sold illegally. If the buyer did not know, they cannot be charged with the crime and they can help lead the court to the person who sold them the stolen car.

Once the proper offender is found, they will face a specific felony charge depending on the type of vehicle that was stolen:

  • Class 3 felony: when the vehicle that is stolen is worth more than $500, but less than $10,000 the offender is punished with a prison term of five years.
  • Class 2 felony: when the stolen vehicle is government property valued at under $10,000 or is a normal vehicle valued more than $10,000, but less than $100,000 the offender will be punished with a prison term of seven years.
  • Class 1 felony: when the stolen vehicle is government property valued at $10,000-$100,000 or a normal vehicle valued at $100,000-$500,000 the offender will be punished with a prison term of 15 years.
  • Class X felony: when the stolen vehicle is government property valued over $100,000 or a normal vehicle valued over $1,000,000 the offender will be punished with a prison term of 30 years.

Contact an Elgin, IL Vehicular Theft Attorney

Since the punishments for vehicular theft are more life-changing than joyriding, it is important for offenders to seek the help of a lawyer after they are arrested. The lawyers of the Law Offices of Brian J. Mirandola can make sure you are not being wrongfully charged with a crime that is more severe than what actually happened. To schedule a free consultation with a Kane County criminal defense lawyer, call our office at 847-488-0889.

 

Sources:

 

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K16-1

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K21-2

 

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Posted on in Felonies

Kane County defense attorney

Facing felony charges comes with significant stress and uncertainty. In all reality, it is important to act quickly after the initial arrest. With an aggressive and comprehensive legal strategy, it is possible you could secure a lesser charge, or avoid a conviction altogether. In Illinois, a felony charge can carry substantial jail time and devastating fines. Immediately after your arrest, it is critical to seek the guidance of an experienced criminal defense attorney who you can believe in. 

Common Illinois Felonies

Here in the state of Illinois, even a Class 4 felony (the lowest of Illinois' felonies) can bring up to $25,000 in fines and as many as three years in prison. Listed below are some of the most common felonies committed throughout the state:

Aggravated DUI: According to Illinois state law, a drinking and driving arrest can be elevated to an aggravated DUI in a number of situations. If a person is convicted of a third or any subsequent DUIs, they will likely face Class 2 felony charges. Other aggravating factors include driving under the influence without a valid driver’s license, while transporting a child, or causing bodily harm to another party. 

Drug Crimes: When facing a drug charge in the state of Illinois, the severity of the charges depend on the type of substance and the quantity. Displayed within 720 ILCS 570/402, possession of drugs such as heroin or cocaine constitute a felony charge, for any amount. If you are found with less than 1 gram, you will likely face a Class 4 felony charge. As the quantity increases, the legal severity does as well. If you are apprehended with an excess of 15 grams of either heroin or cocaine, you could face as many as 15 years in prison. For more information on the implications of a felony drug charge, speak with a legal professional. 

Other Felony Crimes: A felony charge can dramatically impact the rest of your life. From difficulty securing employment or residential opportunities to substantial fines and possible jail time, an arrest of such magnitude should not be taken lightly. Other common felonies committed throughout the state of Illinois include burglary, motor vehicle theft, and forgery. In the event of an arrest, seek out legal assistance immediately.  

Contact an Elgin, IL Felony Defense Lawyer 

With years of legal experience within the state of Illinois, Attorney Brian J. Mirandola relentlessly represents his clients in order to secure the best possible legal outcome. Through consultation regarding the arrest and the development of a precise strategy, a skilled attorney can help you secure a reduction of charges or complete dismissal. To schedule your free consultation with an experienced Kane County criminal defense attorney, contact us today at 847-488-0889. 

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072005700K402

https://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/publications/pdf_publications/dsd_a118.pdf

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assault, Kane County criminal defense attorneyLike many legal terms, people often use the word assault incorrectly. Although it is used casually to refer to aggressive or violent behavior, the Illinois Criminal Code defines the offense much more specifically. If you have been charged with assault, you are probably unsure of what to do next. The best start to effective criminal defense is educating yourself about your charges. If you are facing assault charges, read on to learn what exactly you are up against.

Assault and Battery Defined

The colloquial definition of assault usually refers to some type of physical altercation between individuals. What many think of as assault is actually two separate offenses according to the Illinois Criminal Code: assault and battery. The legal meaning of assault can only be completely understood when one considers the definition of battery.

Battery refers to instances when a person intentionally and without reason "(1) causes bodily harm to an individual or (2) makes physical contact of an insulting or provoking nature with an individual." Battery can include things like a fist fight in a bar, slapping someone’s face, or even something as simple as poking someone in the chest with the intention of provoking them. Assault, in the legal sense, includes the threatening actions which precede aggressive or unwanted physical contact. More precisely, assault occurs when an individual is in "reasonable apprehension of receiving a battery."

Assault and Battery Are Often Charged in Conjunction With Each other

You have probably heard the phrase "assault and battery" before. These two crimes are often charged together but can also be charged separately. An example of an action which would probably lead to an assault charge but not a battery charge is if a person attempted to strike another but missed. Because physical contact was not made, a battery charge would not be appropriate. However, the person who was almost hit experienced assault because he or she was in fear of being punched.

Assault Must Be Intentional

In order for an action to be considered assault, the person committing the action must have knowingly put the target in reasonable apprehension of being hurt. So, actions which are unintentional or accidental cannot be considered assault. Assault can also be justified in situations of self-defense.

Get the Legal Help You Need

Assault or battery charges can be considered a misdemeanor or a felony depending on the circumstances. A conviction can result in jail time and significant fines. If you are facing charges for any type of violent crime, contact a knowledgeable Elgin criminal defense attorney for help. Call 847-488-0889 to schedule your free initial consultation today.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?ActID=1876&ChapterID=53&SeqStart=21100000&SeqEnd=23000000:

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Posted on in DUI

felony, Elgin DUI defense attorneyIn Illinois, there are three classifications of criminal offenses. Petty offenses are the lowest classification and include most traffic violations. The next level of offense a misdemeanor while the highest classification of crime, that which can carry the most serious penalties, is a felony. Those convicted of a felony usually face extended imprisonment as well as other serious punitive consequences. There are some instances in which a charge of driving under the influence (DUI) can be classified as a felony. Felony DUIs, also called aggravated DUIs, carry more severe disciplinary consequences than a misdemeanor DUI does and can seriously affect a convicted person’s ability to find employment or even a home in the future.

Most DUI Charges Are Considered Misdemeanors

If you are an Illinois resident have been charged with a DUI for the very first time, you will almost certainly be charged with a misdemeanor. Felony DUI charges come as a result of more serious violations of the law. Offenses which can result in a felony DUI charge include:

  • Being caught driving under the influence of alcohol three different times;
  • Drinking and driving which results in a passenger under the age of 16 being injured;
  • Being charged with a DUI while having a prior conviction for alcohol-related reckless homicide;
  • Driving under the influence with an expired, suspended, or revoked driver’s license;
  • Drinking and driving without car insurance;
  • Drunk driving which causes an accident in which someone is seriously injured or killed; and
  • Driving a school bus with children on board while intoxicated.

The list of examples above is not exhaustive, and there may be additional special circumstances when result in a DUI charge being increased to an aggravated DUI charge.

Consequences of a Felony Conviction

The criminal sentence imposed on someone who has been convicted of a felony will depend on the specific charges and circumstances of the crime. Felonies in Illinois are divided into five categories. Class 4 felonies are the least serious felony offenses and Class X felonies are the most harshly punished offenses. Felony criminal sanctions include:

  • Class 4 Felony: Punishable by 1-3 years in prison;
  • Class 3 Felony: Punishable by 2-5 years in prison;
  • Class 2 Felony: Punishable by 3-7 years in prison;
  • Class 1 Felony: Punishable by 4-20 years in prison; and
  • Class X Felony: Punishable by 6-30 years in prison.

In addition to imprisonment and fines of up to $25,000, those convicted of a felony face additional consequences such as difficulty finding employment, being excluded from certain job fields, forfeiture of gun ownership rights, and trouble finding a place to live.

Contact a Kane County Aggravated DUI Defense Lawyer

If you have been charged with driving under the influence, contact The The Law Office of Brian J. Mirandola for legal guidance with your case. To schedule a free initial consultation with an Elgin DUI defense attorney, call 847-488-0889 today.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs3.asp?ChapterID=49&ActID=1815

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